Author: 1971: Classic Rock's Classic Year

got-to-rise-above: the–magic-never-stopped: y…

got-to-rise-above:

the–magic-never-stopped:

youdopia:

One of my favorite, if not my favorite, version of Over The Hills And Far Away. 

March 27, 1975. Taped by the legendary Mike Millard on his stealth (hidden under a wheelchair) Nakamichi rig. Insanely good quality. 

Enjoy some great Led Zeppelin. 

More people should know about Mike Millard, the only way how I know about him is through @got-to-rise-above and my friend Phil. 

That was one huge ass deck to be stealth recording with back then……def took some chutzpah to hide from Peter Grant 😉

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The recordings of “Mike the Mike” are more than great bootlegs. In fact, he hated that his shows got turned into bootlegs for sale. He made them for friends, and the care shows. The best of them are time machines that allow you to hear what it was like to BE at those shows. Here’s his unhappy story (including the source of the pic above, of one of Mike’s handmade labels) and here’s a list of his most widely circulating tapes.

forever-blondie: “I wasn’t going to be told by…

forever-blondie:

“I wasn’t going to be told by my record company how to look” – Debbie Harry photographed by Richard Young, 1978

dittymisslizzy: “How can I even try? I can nev…

dittymisslizzy:

“How can I even try? I can never win..”

Help! (1965) dir. Richard Lester

Bob. Cat.

Bob. Cat.

(Jim Marshall photo. Amazing story via popspotsnyc)

Photo

Photo

Andy Warhol and Michael Jackson, 1981, by Lynn…

Andy Warhol and Michael Jackson, 1981, by Lynn Goldsmith via rockandrollphotogallery

John Lennon, January 17 1968, my cleanup of an…

John Lennon, January 17 1968, my cleanup of another priceless scan by beatlesphotoblog

Aretha Franklin, “Rock Steady” on The Flip Wil…

Aretha Franklin, “Rock Steady” on The Flip Wilson Show, aired January 20, 1972. 

Released as a single in February 1971, peaking at #9 on the Billboard Hot 100, and #2 on the Soul Singles chart, this Aretha-penned track gets a blazing new life just 4 days before the release of the astounding Young, Gifted and Black LP. Not only have you never heard this song like this before, you may never have heard Aretha like this before: pedal to the metal and soaring, even by her own elevated standards. 

It’s also inspiring to see the Queen of Soul, “Natural Woman” resplendent in natural hair and an African-inspired gown in this pivotal TV appearance, as detailed in Rickey Vincent’s Party Music: The Inside Story of the Black Panthers’ Band and How Black Power Transformed Soul Music. 

Aretha herself said, “I believe that the black revolution certainly forced me and the majority of black people to begin taking a second look at ourselves. It wasn’t that we were all ashamed of our ourselves, we merely started appreciating our natural selves…you know, falling in love with ourselves just as we are. We found that we had far more to be proud of.

“I must say that mine was a very personal evolution – an evolution of the me in myself. […] I know I’ve improved my overall look and sound, they’re much better. And I’ve gained a great deal of confidence in myself.” 

(More here, although note that Vincent is off on the date of this broadcast, which I verified here. A great read nonetheless.)

This is the sound of Aretha’s newfound confidence, my friends, with one of 1971′s greatest singles taken to new heights. “Rock steady, baby – that’s what I feel now. Let’s call this song exactly what it is!” 

TURN IT UP!

Revolutionary Intercommunal Day of Solidarity …

Revolutionary Intercommunal Day of Solidarity for Black Panther political prisoners including Bobby Seale and Angela Davis, and post-birthday celebration for Huey P. Newton (!), with music by The Grateful Dead (!!!), March 5, 1971

Neil Young, Massey Hall Toronto, 1971, by Greg…

Neil Young, Massey Hall Toronto, 1971, by Greg Stott