Category: classic rock fandom

“I sold my first strap to the amazing ROBERT PLANT 1971!” by Jan Nicolas. “I had been working in leather for a while before I started making straps.  I had a few beautiful ones hanging in my studio/office.  Led Zeppelin were in town at the Continental Hyatt ‘riot’ House Hotel.  My friend Linda and I used to spend weekends hanging out in the coffee shop to star gaze.  In the evening, they had a line winding through the lobby to accommodate all the people who wanted to meet Rock Stars.  

“This was a pretty quiet Saturday afternoon, and I grabbed a strap that I thought would suit RP and we found him hanging out in the lobby with body guards, groupies and photographers.  

“I was so shy, that my girlfriend had to call him over to look at the strap.  He loved it, he paid $100 for it and gladly posed for a photo.  Happily, one of the magazine photographers was a friend, and took this picture for me.  I was still in high school, and I was  completely overwhelmed when Mr. Plant cuddled right up to me for the picture.  Now, it is my all time favorite.”

More here. My edits to the pictures she posted, but do click through for more of her amazing story.

“I sold my first strap to the amazing ROBERT PLANT 1971!” by Jan Nicolas. “I had been working in leather for a while before I started making straps.  I had a few beautiful ones hanging in my studio/office.  Led Zeppelin were in town at the Continental Hyatt ‘riot’ House Hotel.  My friend Linda and I used to spend weekends hanging out in the coffee shop to star gaze.  In the evening, they had a line winding through the lobby to accommodate all the people who wanted to meet Rock Stars.  

“This was a pretty quiet Saturday afternoon, and I grabbed a strap that I thought would suit RP and we found him hanging out in the lobby with body guards, groupies and photographers.  

“I was so shy, that my girlfriend had to call him over to look at the strap.  He loved it, he paid $100 for it and gladly posed for a photo.  Happily, one of the magazine photographers was a friend, and took this picture for me.  I was still in high school, and I was  completely overwhelmed when Mr. Plant cuddled right up to me for the picture.  Now, it is my all time favorite.”

More here. My edits to the pictures she posted, but do click through for more of her amazing story.

Pink Biker At The Gates of Dawn

Chicago 1973 – by Camille Davis Russo:

firethatgrewsolow:

brownskinsugarplum76:

firethatgrewsolow:

FANTASTIC story about Zep – must read!!!

First off, thank you to @firethatgrewsolow for posting this originally. You all had some fantastic posts here before I started, and I’m so excited to bump into from time to time. 😁❤️ GUYS… This is AMAZING! It’s a firsthand account of a woman who hung around LZ a little bit that was posted to the official LZ site. There are so many wonderful details about the lads that confirm or enhance things I’ve always thought about them. My personal highlights:

More than that, I knew I must break away from the spell Led Zeppelin cast, or I’d no longer be able to carry on as before. For awhile though, I let myself fall prey to the vision of Robert Plant as he shook his blond hair and danced.

***

It was quite a show, too, with an M.C., dancing girls, three acts and a band. Blues Man announced the presence of Led Zeppelin to the all-black audience, and asked Robert Plant to come up and take a bow.

He did so most graciously, returning the honor to Bobby Bland, whose fan, Robert explained, he was. Everyone loved him, and applauded him wildly. Drinks were ordered, and all the people at the tables around us were smiling brightly.

By the time Bobby Bland came on, it was three A.M. and still an inferno. As usual, he was greeted with the fainting of feminine fans, for which he is famous. After the show, we waited almost an hour in the cars for Robert. He was upstairs holding Bobby’s gun, while they counted the money.

***

Aria asked me if I would straighten up Robert’s room while he was gone. I said I’d love to. I felt it was an honor to be among his possessions. I was very timid at first, almost reverent. There were many books by his bedside, and his British passport with its coat-of-arms embossed in gold. I made his bed, and took away the tea cups, with all the lemons he had used for Vitamin C. I hung his silk shirts in the closet, and adoringly put away his shoes in pairs. Some were silver slippers with stars on the toes. His hair brush was from England, with a ruby red handle. Although I never really got to talk to Robert, this was a very subtle experience of knowing him.

***

They went on to the concert in Detroit that night, and I rested up at home. The next day was their last in Chicago. It was the best time of all, too. There were no concerts, the day was completely free. John Paul Jones was watching the Watergate hearings, and BP was taking pictures of everyone.

Loved every word of this.

Must reblog bc this is really good shit.  A peek behind the curtain.  I absolutely adore hearing about experiences like this.  Not tawdry (although I like those, too ha) – just painting a picture of what it was like to spend some time w the biggest band in the world.

What a remarkable story! Words I didn’t expect: “I shall never forget their kindness.” I’m not sure what I did expect, but it wasn’t this. A must read for anyone who wants to hop in a time machine, Zeppelin fan or not.

I posted this right after I heard that they buried Tom, and I was crying so much I couldn’t even write anything about it. It’s taken me days later, until his birthday, to reckon with the fact that THIS video is what forced me, and finally allowed me, to say good-bye. 

It’s a gorgeous, powerfully delicate acoustic reframing of my favorite song of his, “Learning to Fly”, with a soaring piano interlude from Benmont Tench as Tom dances to the lip of the stage, and backing vocals from Stevie Nicks, with a look on her face that makes clear that no force in heaven or on earth could have stopped her from standing in this place, in this moment, arms lifted, heart singing. Finally, Tom opens his arms to the crowd and invites them (and us) to join in.

(godammit, no, I’M not crying again. YOU’RE crying.)

One of the things that always made me fond of him is that, as much as any artist in the game, he stayed a member of the fandom. Yeah, he was a star, and he embraced it, but he was also a fan. He took at much pleasure from being with Stevie, Bob, George, Jeff, Roy, Prince, and everyone else he played with that you or I would have. It amazed and delighted him.

He didn’t always keep his roles as rock star and rock fan perfectly balanced, and he had deep conflicts in his relationship to his own work as a result. That too was part of his charm. Being a rock and roller may have come naturally, he may have been incapable of doing anything else, been driven to create – but none of it ever came all that easily, and he was unfailingly honest about that.

I had my own mixed feelings about this or that part of his career, but none of that matters now. I’m glad to have shared 40 years of being a fan of a lot of the same folks with him. I’m glad to have a reason to remember that in addition to parts of his work that I enjoy, there’s some that I deeply treasure. Like this beautiful performance of this beautiful song. 

“I’ll fly over my worries, fly over my troubles, one day”: a prayer, a promise, a benediction, a kiss good-bye.

“I sold my first strap to the amazing ROBERT PLANT 1971!” by Jan Nicolas. “I had been working in leather for a while before I started making straps.  I had a few beautiful ones hanging in my studio/office.  Led Zeppelin were in town at the Continental Hyatt ‘riot’ House Hotel.  My friend Linda and I used to spend weekends hanging out in the coffee shop to star gaze.  In the evening, they had a line winding through the lobby to accommodate all the people who wanted to meet Rock Stars.  

“This was a pretty quiet Saturday afternoon, and I grabbed a strap that I thought would suit RP and we found him hanging out in the lobby with body guards, groupies and photographers.  

“I was so shy, that my girlfriend had to call him over to look at the strap.  He loved it, he paid $100 for it and gladly posed for a photo.  Happily, one of the magazine photographers was a friend, and took this picture for me.  I was still in high school, and I was  completely overwhelmed when Mr. Plant cuddled right up to me for the picture.  Now, it is my all time favorite.”

More here. My edits to the pictures she posted, but do click through for more of her amazing story.

“I sold my first strap to the amazing ROBERT PLANT 1971!” by Jan Nicolas. “I had been working in leather for a while before I started making straps.  I had a few beautiful ones hanging in my studio/office.  Led Zeppelin were in town at the Continental Hyatt ‘riot’ House Hotel.  My friend Linda and I used to spend weekends hanging out in the coffee shop to star gaze.  In the evening, they had a line winding through the lobby to accommodate all the people who wanted to meet Rock Stars.  

“This was a pretty quiet Saturday afternoon, and I grabbed a strap that I thought would suit RP and we found him hanging out in the lobby with body guards, groupies and photographers.  

“I was so shy, that my girlfriend had to call him over to look at the strap.  He loved it, he paid $100 for it and gladly posed for a photo.  Happily, one of the magazine photographers was a friend, and took this picture for me.  I was still in high school, and I was  completely overwhelmed when Mr. Plant cuddled right up to me for the picture.  Now, it is my all time favorite.”

More here. My edits to the pictures she posted, but do click through for more of her amazing story.

“I sold my first strap to the amazing ROBERT PLANT 1971!” by Jan Nicolas. “I had been working in leather for a while before I started making straps.  I had a few beautiful ones hanging in my studio/office.  Led Zeppelin were in town at the Continental Hyatt ‘riot’ House Hotel.  My friend Linda and I used to spend weekends hanging out in the coffee shop to star gaze.  In the evening, they had a line winding through the lobby to accommodate all the people who wanted to meet Rock Stars.  

“This was a pretty quiet Saturday afternoon, and I grabbed a strap that I thought would suit RP and we found him hanging out in the lobby with body guards, groupies and photographers.  

“I was so shy, that my girlfriend had to call him over to look at the strap.  He loved it, he paid $100 for it and gladly posed for a photo.  Happily, one of the magazine photographers was a friend, and took this picture for me.  I was still in high school, and I was  completely overwhelmed when Mr. Plant cuddled right up to me for the picture.  Now, it is my all time favorite.”

More here. My edits to the pictures she posted, but do click through for more of her amazing story.

firethatgrewsolow:

This is all you need to know about Led Zeppelin.

This is also all you need to know about the classic rock fandom: young women have been its beating heart from the very beginning. Not just the screaming, but the passion, the knowledge, and the buying power. Don’t let boys try to tell you otherwise.

I posted this right after I heard that they buried Tom, and I was crying so much I couldn’t even write anything about it. It’s taken me days later, until his birthday, to reckon with the fact that THIS video is what forced me, and finally allowed me, to say good-bye. 

It’s a gorgeous, powerfully delicate acoustic reframing of my favorite song of his, “Learning to Fly”, with a soaring piano interlude from Benmont Tench as Tom dances to the lip of the stage, and backing vocals from Stevie Nicks, with a look on her face that makes clear that no force in heaven or on earth could have stopped her from standing in this place, in this moment, arms lifted, heart singing. Finally, Tom opens his arms to the crowd and invites them (and us) to join in.

(godammit, no, I’M not crying again. YOU’RE crying.)

One of the things that always made me fond of him is that, as much as any artist in the game, he stayed a member of the fandom. Yeah, he was a star, and he embraced it, but he was also a fan. He took at much pleasure from being with Stevie, Bob, George, Jeff, Roy, Prince, and everyone else he played with that you or I would have. It amazed and delighted him.

He didn’t always keep his roles as rock star and rock fan perfectly balanced, and he had deep conflicts in his relationship to his own work as a result. That too was part of his charm. Being a rock and roller may have come naturally, he may have been incapable of doing anything else, been driven to create – but none of it ever came all that easily, and he was unfailingly honest about that.

I had my own mixed feelings about this or that part of his career, but none of that matters now. I’m glad to have shared 40 years of being a fan of a lot of the same folks with him. I’m glad to have a reason to remember that in addition to parts of his work that I enjoy, there’s some that I deeply treasure. Like this beautiful performance of this beautiful song. 

“I’ll fly over my worries, fly over my troubles, one day”: a prayer, a promise, a benediction, a kiss good-bye.