Category: classic rock

Pink Floyd, Atom Heart Mother, QUADROPHONIC 8-…

Pink Floyd, Atom Heart Mother, QUADROPHONIC 8-TRACK

John & Yoko in the kitchen at Tittenhurst,…

John & Yoko in the kitchen at Tittenhurst, 1971, by George Konig

Janis Joplin on The Ed Sullivan Show, 1969, by…

Janis Joplin on The Ed Sullivan Show, 1969, by Jim Cummins

Lou Reed screen tests for Andy Warhol, 1966

Lou Reed screen tests for Andy Warhol, 1966

Marc Bolan, looking mighty glammy, with Bob Dy…

Marc Bolan, looking mighty glammy, with Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits Vol. II, released November 17, 1971.

Mick Jagger in Vienna, 1973, by Anwar Hussein….

Mick Jagger in Vienna, 1973, by Anwar Hussein. Nice shoes, man.

The Grateful Dead, West Park, Ann Arbor Michig…

The Grateful Dead, West Park, Ann Arbor Michigan, 1967, by Leni Sinclair. Nice pants, Jerry!

Jim Morrison, at work on 1971′s L.A. Woman

Jim Morrison, at work on 1971′s L.A. Woman

Guitar Boogie: Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimmy …

Guitar Boogie: Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page 1971 UK compilation album 

Aretha Franklin, “Rock Steady” on The Flip Wil…

Aretha Franklin, “Rock Steady” on The Flip Wilson Show, aired January 20, 1972. 

Released as a single in February 1971, peaking at #9 on the Billboard Hot 100, and #2 on the Soul Singles chart, this Aretha-penned track gets a blazing new life just 4 days before the release of the astounding Young, Gifted and Black LP. Not only have you never heard this song like this before, you may never have heard Aretha like this before: pedal to the metal and soaring, even by her own elevated standards. 

It’s also inspiring to see the Queen of Soul, “Natural Woman” resplendent in natural hair and an African-inspired gown in this pivotal TV appearance, as detailed in Rickey Vincent’s Party Music: The Inside Story of the Black Panthers’ Band and How Black Power Transformed Soul Music. 

Aretha herself said, “I believe that the black revolution certainly forced me and the majority of black people to begin taking a second look at ourselves. It wasn’t that we were all ashamed of our ourselves, we merely started appreciating our natural selves…you know, falling in love with ourselves just as we are. We found that we had far more to be proud of.

“I must say that mine was a very personal evolution – an evolution of the me in myself. […] I know I’ve improved my overall look and sound, they’re much better. And I’ve gained a great deal of confidence in myself.” 

(More here, although note that Vincent is off on the date of this broadcast, which I verified here. A great read nonetheless.)

This is the sound of Aretha’s newfound confidence, my friends, with one of 1971′s greatest singles taken to new heights. “Rock steady, baby – that’s what I feel now. Let’s call this song exactly what it is!” 

TURN IT UP!