Category: humble pie

Peter Frampton with Humble Pie, “Shine On”, 1971

in which our 20-year-old hero helps the band find its hardest-rocking groove on their 4th album together, at exactly the time he decides he wants to head in a more eclectic, acoustic direction himself, and soon departs for a solo career. 

As a matter of fact, both Frampton and Humble Pie would quickly ascend to previously unimaginable heights once they went their separate ways that fall. Nevertheless, 1971 offered some sneak peeks at what those peaks would look like, however, including their July 3 performance in front of 100,000 fans in London’s Hyde Park,  opening for Grand Funk. (You can see a glimpse of that in the poster frame for the video above, and here below via loudersound.)

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Recorded in January 1971 and released in March, Rock On opened with Frampton’s composition “Shine On”, a mid-tempo funky groover featuring the Soul Sisters (P.P. Arnold, Claudia Lennear, and Doris Troy) on the chorus. This is the one song from Frampton’s years with Humble Pie that has been part of his concert repertoire ever since, as well it should be. 

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I’ll save for another day the story of Peter’s leaving Humble Pie (short version: drugs, which Peter wasn’t using), but the irony is, the live album he recorded with Humble Pie in 1971 was a smash, and the band was suddenly huge.

And on his first solo tour, who did Peter wind up opening for? OF COURSE, it was Humble Pie. “I thought I’d made the worst decision in my entire career,” he laughs. “They’d stand side of stage making farting noises during my set, but all’s fair in love and war. I had my Wind Of Change band and I made a point of playing ‘Shine On’. It was a very interesting tour.” [x]

As an A-side in 1971 for Humble Pie, “Shine On” failed to chart, but Peter continued to play it, eventually featuring it prominently as part of Frampton Comes Alive, and placing it as the B-side to the 1976 Top 10 single “Show Me The Way.”

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(these 2 photos via 45cat)

So yeah, you’ve surely heard THAT version of the song (my own play count is somewhere north of 10,000), but maybe not THIS one. 

This 1971 studio version really is an all-time gem. The arrangement is a bit dated, but it’s also a clarion call, the sound of Peter Frampton, age 20, finding his bedrock and stepping confidently into the light: somewhere between pop and rock, sprinkled with a bit of funk and considerable groove. From here, our boy Peter would continue to Shine On.

Peter Frampton with Humble Pie, “Shine On”, 1971

in which our 20-year-old hero helps the band find its hardest-rocking groove on their 4th album together, at exactly the time he decides he wants to head in a more eclectic, acoustic direction himself, and soon departs for a solo career. 

As a matter of fact, both Frampton and Humble Pie would quickly ascend to previously unimaginable heights once they went their separate ways that fall. Nevertheless, 1971 offered some sneak peeks at what those peaks would look like, however, including their July 3 performance in front of 100,000 fans in London’s Hyde Park,  opening for Grand Funk. (You can see a glimpse of that in the poster frame for the video above, and here below via loudersound.)

image

Recorded in January 1971 and released in March, Rock On opened with Frampton’s composition “Shine On”, a mid-tempo funky groover featuring the Soul Sisters (P.P. Arnold, Claudia Lennear, and Doris Troy) on the chorus. This is the one song from Frampton’s years with Humble Pie that has been part of his concert repertoire ever since, as well it should be. 

image

I’ll save for another day the story of Peter’s leaving Humble Pie (short version: drugs, which Peter wasn’t using), but the irony is, the live album he recorded with Humble Pie in 1971 was a smash, and the band was suddenly huge.

And on his first solo tour, who did Peter wind up opening for? OF COURSE, it was Humble Pie. “I thought I’d made the worst decision in my entire career,” he laughs. “They’d stand side of stage making farting noises during my set, but all’s fair in love and war. I had my Wind Of Change band and I made a point of playing ‘Shine On’. It was a very interesting tour.” [x]

As an A-side in 1971 for Humble Pie, “Shine On” failed to chart, but Peter continued to play it, eventually featuring it prominently as part of Frampton Comes Alive, and placing it as the B-side to the 1976 Top 10 single “Show Me The Way.”

image
image

(these 2 photos via 45cat)

So yeah, you’ve surely heard THAT version of the song (my own play count is somewhere north of 10,000), but maybe not THIS one. 

This 1971 studio version really is an all-time gem. The arrangement is a bit dated, but it’s also a clarion call, the sound of Peter Frampton, age 20, finding his bedrock and stepping confidently into the light: somewhere between pop and rock, sprinkled with a bit of funk and considerable groove. From here, our boy Peter would continue to Shine On.

that70s-girl:

Happy birthday Peter Frampton! 😎💕

Peter Frampton with Humble Pie, “Shine On”, 1971, in which our 20-year-old hero helps the band find its hardest-rocking groove on their 4th album together, at exactly the time he decides he wants to head in a more eclectic, acoustic direction himself, and soon departs for a solo career. 

As a matter of fact, both Frampton and Humble Pie would quickly ascend to previously unimaginable heights once they went their separate ways that fall. 1971 offered some sneak peeks at what those peaks would look like, however, including their July performance in front of 100,000 fans in London’s Hyde Park,  opening for Grand Funk.

image

Recorded in January 1971 and released in March, Rock On opened with Frampton’s composition “Shine On”, a mid-tempo funky groover featuring the Soul Sisters (P.P. Arnold, Claudia Lennear, and Doris Troy) on the chorus. This is the one song from Frampton’s years with Humble Pie that has been part of his concert repertoire ever since, as well it should be. 

As an A-side in 1971 for Humble Pie, “Shine On” failed to chart, but the song featured prominently as part of Frampton Comes Alive, and was the B-side to the 1976 Top 10 single “Show Me The Way.”

image
image

(these 2 photos via 45cat)

So yeah, you’ve surely heard THAT version (my own play count is somewhere north of 10,000), but maybe not THIS one. This 971 studio version by our 20-year-old hero really is an all-time gem. The arrangement is a bit dated, but it’s also a clarion call, the sound of Peter Frampton finding his bedrock and stepping confidently into the light: somewhere between pop and rock, both rocking yet grooving. From here, our boy Peter would continue to Shine On.

Happy Pie Day! HUMBLE Pie, that is, with one of 1971′s heaviest tracks, “I Don’t Need No Doctor”

(And yes, I know that it’s Pi Day. BUT I CAN’T HEAR YOU. I’M ROCKING TOO HARD.)

Being a little more specific, “I Don’t Need No Doctor” is not exactly a 1971 tune. It’s a Nick Ashford-Valerie Simpson-Jo Armistead composition first recorded by Ray Charles in 1966. However, in 1971, Humble Pie had a major breakthrough with an advance single release of this track culled from their landmark live album Performance Rockin’ The Fillmore

The shows were recorded at the end of May, and the single was whipped right around barely a month later. It sold well enough, but its ubiquity on FM radio had a great deal to do with the album peaking at #21 in the US when it was released in October (far outselling the Allman Brothers live Fillmore release!).

And to be clear, the title of the video notwithstanding, this show is in fact from 1972, but it’s a better example than anything I could find from ‘71 of just what a force of nature these guys were on stage. Steve Marriott in particular had a giant voice that belied his size (the official 5′5″ is generous), polished on ride through 1971 that saw Humble Pie opening for Grand Funk Railroad in front of 100,000 at Hyde Park and a Shea Stadium show that sold out in a fraction of the time it took The Beatles. 

Packing that stadium-sized voice into the 2500-seat Fillmore East – well, you don’t have to guess how hard that hit. Hopefully you’ve already hit Play on that video up there and KNOW how hard it hit. Plenty of Pie to go around! Turn it up!