Category: Jeff Lynne

thateventuality:

Photo by Neal Preston (?)

“It was all great. It’s hard to think of a best thing. You’re in the best band you’ve seen, with all your heroes who are also your friends. It’s still hard to conceive, just a fabulous thing. […] [George Harrison talked] a lot [about wanting to do a third album]. He talked for the rest of his life about doing it again or maybe taking it on the road. It is one of my great regrets that I wasn’t a little more aggressive about getting that done. I always thought we’d have all the time in the world to do it. […] I’m just glad that the work that we did holds up. It still warms my heart to hear it and I think it makes a lot of people happy and that’s the nicest part of it.” – Tom Petty, Mass Live archives, 2007 (More at thateventuality on Instagram)

Electric Light Orchestra, 1974.
Photographer: Peter Mazel

From The History of Rock | 1974

bilbao-song:

The Move – California Man – {x}

bellebooo:

Elo at Midnight Special, 1973 (Photos by Paul Bailey)

hotsforthewilburys:

On the set of “I Won’t Back Down” music video. 

The Original! The Move’s 1971 banger, “Do Ya!”

You’ve heard the 1976 hit version from The Electric Light Orchestra, a pop classic by any measure – but this stripped-down 1971 version by The Move SLAMS! It’s obviously the same song of course, but it really sounds beamed in from another dimension as peeling back all the layers reveals the downright weirdness at its heart. 

(Seriously, one of the weirdest songs ever to become a hit.)

Presumably you’ve already hit play and heard the biggest difference between this and the 1976 ELO version: that one had an orchestra and choir, and this one is just composer Jeff Lynne, Roy Wood, and drummer Bev Bevan BANGING. Although Jeff wrote it, the song’s original title was named for a spontaneous outburst of Roy Wood’s at the end of the song, “Look Out Baby There’s A Plane A-Comin’”. (Yes, that was the original title! I think “Do Ya” works better tho.)

(Tom Petty later told Jeff that he thought “Look out baby there’s a planet coming” was one of the coolest lyrics he’d ever heard, and was disappointed to learn the proper words.)

Although the song had been a staple in ELO’s live sets, they didn’t get around to recording it until 1976, after Todd Rundgren’s cover on Another Live became something of a hit itself in 1975 (with Todd repaying a favor to Jeff, who’d regularly been performing Todd’s early Nazz track “Open Your Eyes”). 

In fact, it was this original version’s complete lack of orchestration that landed the song with The Move rather than ELO. (Both Message From The Country and ELO’s debut were recorded more or less simultaneously, with the more orchestral tracks naturally landing with ELO.) 

Recorded December 19, 1971, and released as the B-side to “California Man”, it failed to chart in the UK, and in 1972, barely cracked the US Top 100, landing at #98. Its days as a chart-topper were yet to come.

I do love ELO’s 1976 version, and the 1975 version by Todd Rundgren’s Utopia (which I’ll discuss in full another day) might even be my favorite, but there’s something special and irreplaceable about the original “Do Ya” from 1971.

Turn this tf up, play it again, and let me know what you think!

1972 Electric Light Orchestra and Sparks concert poster

(via: Sparks Fan Group)

The Original! The Move’s 1971 banger, “Do Ya!”

You’ve heard the 1976 hit version from The Electric Light Orchestra, a pop classic by any measure – but this stripped-down 1971 version by The Move SLAMS! It’s obviously the same song of course, but it really sounds beamed in from another dimension as peeling back all the layers reveals the downright weirdness at its heart. 

(Seriously, one of the weirdest songs ever to become a hit.)

Presumably you’ve already hit play and heard the biggest difference between this and the 1976 ELO version: that one had an orchestra and choir, and this one is just composer Jeff Lynne, Roy Wood, and drummer Bev Bevan BANGING. Although Jeff wrote it, the song’s original title was named for a spontaneous outburst of Roy Wood’s at the end of the song, “Look Out Baby There’s A Plane A-Comin’”. (Yes, that was the original title! I think “Do Ya” works better tho.)

(Tom Petty later told Jeff that he thought “Look out baby there’s a planet coming” was one of the coolest lyrics he’d ever heard, and was disappointed to learn the proper words.)

Although the song had been a staple in ELO’s live sets, they didn’t get around to recording it until 1976, after Todd Rundgren’s cover on Another Live became something of a hit itself in 1975 (with Todd repaying a favor to Jeff, who’d regularly been performing Todd’s early Nazz track “Open Your Eyes”). 

In fact, it was this original version’s complete lack of orchestration that landed the song with The Move rather than ELO. (Both Message From The Country and ELO’s debut were recorded more or less simultaneously, with the more orchestral tracks naturally landing with ELO,) 

Recorded December 19, 1971, and released as the B-side to “California Man”, it failed to chart in the UK, and in 1972, barely cracked the US Top 100, landing at #98. Its days as a chart-topper were yet to come.

I do love ELO’s 1976 version, and the 1975 version by Todd Rundgren’s Utopia (which I’ll discuss in full another day) might even be my favorite, but there’s something special and irreplaceable about the original “Do Ya” from 1971.

Turn this tf up, play it again, and let me know what you think!

Electric Light Orchestra Advertisement

From the September 14, 1978 issue of CIRCUS Magazine

Tom Petty sings “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” and Prince burns it down to the ground, 2004. This video from 2004′s Rock Hall induction festivities made the rounds when Prince passed away, because his final solo (and tossing his guitar in the air when it ends) is rightly remembered as legendary. 

Before then, though, the song is borne aloft by Tom Petty’s heartfelt lead vocal and acoustic 12-string (supported by George’s son Dhani). Tom and George’s brother Wilbury Jeff Lynne takes the vocal on the bridge, Jeff’s guitarist Marc Mann takes the first solo, Steve Winwood (there to be inducted with Traffic) on organ, and yeah, that insane solo from Prince at the end – but this is also a great time to remember Tom’s gifts as a bandleader who knows when to step back and let his mates take the spotlight.

“You see me nodding at him, to say, ‘Go on, go on,’” Petty says. “I remember I leaned out at him at one point and gave him a ‘This is going great!’ kind of look. 

“He just burned it up. You could feel the electricity of ‘something really big’s going down here.’”

But what about that disappearing guitar? Once it leaves Prince’s hands, it never reappears, and the video shows no one catching it. Even Petty’s drummer, Steve Ferrone, remains confused about it—and he was onstage.

“I didn’t even see who caught it,” he says. “I just saw it go up, and I was astonished that it didn’t come back down again.

“Everybody wonders where that guitar went, and I gotta tell you, I was on the stage, and I wonder where it went, too.”