Category: oakland

Freddie by the Bay: Oakland, December 16, 1978…

Freddie by the Bay: Oakland, December 16, 1978 by Ed Perlstein, via queenpoland

Stevie Nicks, Oakland 1976, by Ken Regan. Many…

Stevie Nicks, Oakland 1976, by Ken Regan. Many, many versions of this floating around, but I love this new, razor-sharp scan with delicate sepia highlights courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery.

Freddie Mercury in Oakland, December 16, 1978,…

Freddie Mercury in Oakland, December 16, 1978, by Ed Perlstein, via vogue

Something uniquely soft about Punk Freddie with his fist clenched. Amazing.

Brian May in Oakland, December 16, 1978 by Cha…

Brian May in Oakland, December 16, 1978 by Charlie DeMore,  via queenlive.ca

Stevie Nicks: “There Is Nothing Better Than Be…

Stevie Nicks: “There Is Nothing Better Than Being Inducted Into the Hall of Fame”

I joined Fleetwood Mac at the beginning of 1975. We started talking about the solo album at the end of 1979, so my solo work was just a little over four years behind Fleetwood Mac. It has made my life amazing because I’ve been able to have these two amazing careers and live in two completely different worlds.

How do you feel about being the first woman to enter the Hall of Fame twice?
Well, that’s probably the biggest part of it. After the show last night I was talking to the Haim girls. I was saying to them, “Okay, now I’ve opened the door for you. Now each one of you need to go do a solo album really fast and get your solos going so in the next 20 years you’ll be able to do this too and maybe I’ve opened the doors to all the girls in my life that sing and write and play and are amazing.”

I didn’t have children, but I sort of do have a house full of daughters since I have so many women singers around me that are in their twenties all the way up to not quite as old as me that are friends of mine. We discuss music and we talk about it and we’re friends. Every time I play a show they come. That’s because we have so much to talk about and so much to share, just about being women musicians and what we love and what we want to do.

My biggest hope is that I have opened the door due to the fact that there’s 22 men who have gone in twice and zero women. I think that’s really a little off balance. That’s what I’m hoping, that what’s happened here to me will give all the little rock and roll stars that are just waiting out there a little hope that they can also do what I do. Mind you, it took a long time. I’m 70 years old. It took a long time for this to happen, but maybe because of this it won’t take so long for all the other incredibly talented women that I know and that I respect and that I listen to and that I’m friends with. That’s really the nicest thing.

~ Stevie Nicks in Rolling Stone, my gently edited excerpt. You really need to read the whole thing, though, here.

Photo above by Clayton Call, of Stevie in Oakland on October 3, 1981, on her first solo tour.

Freddie Mercury in Oakland, December 16, 1978,…

Freddie Mercury in Oakland, December 16, 1978, by Ed Perlstein, via vogue

Something uniquely soft about Punk Freddie with his fist clenched. Amazing.

Stevie Nicks, Oakland 1976, by Ken Regan. Many…

Stevie Nicks, Oakland 1976, by Ken Regan. Many, many versions of this floating around, but I love this new, razor-sharp scan with delicate sepia highlights courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery.

Stevie Nicks: “There Is Nothing Better Than …

Stevie Nicks: “There Is Nothing Better Than Being Inducted Into the Hall of Fame”

I joined Fleetwood Mac at the beginning of 1975. We started talking about the solo album at the end of 1979, so my solo work was just a little over four years behind Fleetwood Mac. It has made my life amazing because I’ve been able to have these two amazing careers and live in two completely different worlds.

How do you feel about being the first woman to enter the Hall of Fame twice?
Well, that’s probably the biggest part of it. After the show last night I was talking to the Haim girls. I was saying to them, “Okay, now I’ve opened the door for you. Now each one of you need to go do a solo album really fast and get your solos going so in the next 20 years you’ll be able to do this too and maybe I’ve opened the doors to all the girls in my life that sing and write and play and are amazing.”

I didn’t have children, but I sort of do have a house full of daughters since I have so many women singers around me that are in their twenties all the way up to not quite as old as me that are friends of mine. We discuss music and we talk about it and we’re friends. Every time I play a show they come. That’s because we have so much to talk about and so much to share, just about being women musicians and what we love and what we want to do.

My biggest hope is that I have opened the door due to the fact that there’s 22 men who have gone in twice and zero women. I think that’s really a little off balance. That’s what I’m hoping, that what’s happened here to me will give all the little rock and roll stars that are just waiting out there a little hope that they can also do what I do. Mind you, it took a long time. I’m 70 years old. It took a long time for this to happen, but maybe because of this it won’t take so long for all the other incredibly talented women that I know and that I respect and that I listen to and that I’m friends with. That’s really the nicest thing.

~ Stevie Nicks in Rolling Stone, my gently edited excerpt. You really need to read the whole thing, though, here.

Photo above by Clayton Call, of Stevie in Oakland on October 3, 1981, on her first solo tour.

Robert Plant, Oakland, July 24, 1977, by John …

Robert Plant, Oakland, July 24, 1977, by John C. Maginnis. No, not the iconic Nurse shirt of the day before, but I think the Plain White T looks mighty, mighty fine too.

Freddie by the Bay: Oakland, December 16, 1978…

Freddie by the Bay: Oakland, December 16, 1978 by Ed Perlstein, via queenpoland